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Monday, December 11, 2017

Etymology Of The Last Name "Jones" & Its Frequency In The United States, With Special Attention To African Americans

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about the etymology of the last name (surname) "Jones" and the frequency of its use in the United States, particularly with Black Americans.

The content of this post is given for etymological purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/12/etymology-about-last-name-moore-its.html for a somewhat related post on the etymology of the last name "Moore" & its frequency in the USA.

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/02/washington-blackest-last-name-in-united.html for a related 2016 pancocojams post entitled "Washington"- The Blackest Last Name In The United States.

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ETYMOLOGY OF THE LAST NAME "JONES"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jones_(surname)
"Jones is a surname of English and Welsh origins, meaning "John's son". It is most common in Wales and south central England.[1][2] In Ireland the surname has been Gaelicized as Mac Seóin.

History[edit]

Distribution of Jones surname in Britain
It first appears on record as a surname in England in 1273 with the name "Matilda Jones".[2] Others put the first known record of the surname Jones as 1279, in Huntingdonshire, England.[3] Around the time of the union of Wales with England, the traditional Welsh system of patronymics was increasingly replaced by surnames. Furthermore, Christian names such as John which were common in England had become increasingly preferred to distinctively Welsh Christian names such as Meredudd and Llewelyn. Thus "Mab Ioan" or "ap Sion" (and many other variations) meaning "son of John" became the surname Jones in a large number of cases, making it a very frequently used surname.[4]

20th and 21st centuries
Jones remains the most popular surname in Wales, borne by 5.75% of the population.[5] The frequency in England is lower, at 0.75%, making it the second most common surname, after Smith.[5] The 2000 United States census provides a frequency of 0.50%, providing an overall rank of fifth most frequent with 57.7% White, 37.7% Black, 1.4% Hispanic, 0.9% Native American.[6] Jones was the fourth most common surname in the 1990 U.S. Census, behind only Smith, Johnson and Williams.[7] The popularity of the Jones surname in North America is in part owed to the use of Jones as an anglicized or shortened form of various cognate and like-sounding surnames from various European Languages.[8] These names are thought to include the German Jans, Jentz, Janz and possibly Janson, as well as the Scandinavian Jönsson, Johansen and Jonasen among some others, along with Polish Janowski, French Jean and Jacques, Irish MacSeáin, English Johnson, Spanish Jimenez and possibly Gomez, Italian Giannio, Serbian Jovanovic, Dutch Janzen and Scots Johnston (A habitational name)."

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FREQUENCY OF THE LAST NAME "MOORE" AMONG BLACK AMERICANS
Excerpt #1:
From https://names.mongabay.com/data/black.html
Most common last names for Blacks in the U.S. [2000]
"The following is a list of the most common surnames for people who self-identified as "Black" in America during the 2000 Census [updated data]. The data, which may include people who identified themselves as African-American, African, or other ethnic or racial groups, is derived from the U.S. Bureau of the Census.

Last name / Surname: JONES

[...]

Surname rank among blacks: 4

[...]

% of people with surname self-identifying as 'black': 37.7%

U.S. Rank: 5 "

****
Excerpt #2:
From https://names.mongabay.com/race/2010/population-black.html [2010]
"Name: JONES

[...]

Surname rank among blacks: 4

% black in genpop 2010: 38.48%

[...]

% Total general population rank: 5 "

****
Excerpt #3:
From http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/05/50-most-common-african-american.html "50 MOST COMMON AFRICAN AMERICAN SURNAMES (Based on Births among Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Residents) During 1992-2001
"Note: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is the largest city in Allegheny County.

[...]
3. Jones (518 ) [# of Black babies* with the surname "Jones" who were born in Allegheny County during those years; "Black" defined as anyone of Black descent, included children of Black/non-Black birth parents]

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A FEW FAMOUS BLACK AMERICANS WITH THE LAST NAME "JONES"
These names are given in no particular order.

"James Earl Jones (born January 17, 1931) is an American actor. His career has spanned more than 60 years, and he has been described as "one of America's most distinguished and versatile" actors[4] and "one of the greatest actors in American history." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Earl_Jones

**
"Grace Beverly Jones (born 19 May 1948) is a Jamaican singer, songwriter, supermodel, record producer, and actress. Born in Jamaica, she moved when she was 13, along with her siblings, to live with her parents in Syracuse, New York.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grace_Jones

**
"Jonathan David Samuel Jones (October 7, 1911 – September 3, 1985) was an American jazz drummer. A band leader and pioneer in jazz percussion, Jones anchored the Count Basie Orchestra rhythm section from 1934 to 1948. He was sometimes known as Papa Jo Jones to distinguish him from younger drummer Philly Joe Jones."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jo_Jones

**
"Orlando Jones (born April 10, 1968) is an American comedian and actor. He is known for being one of the original cast members of the sketch comedy series MADtv and for his role as the 7 Up spokesman from 1999 to 2002." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlando_Jones

**
"Sharon Lafaye Jones (May 4, 1956 – November 18, 2016) was an American soul and funk singer. She was the lead singer of Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings, a soul and funk band based in Brooklyn, New York."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharon_Jones

**
"Amiri Baraka (born Everett LeRoi Jones; October 7, 1934 – January 9, 2014), previously known as LeRoi Jones and Imamu Amiri Baraka*, was an African-American writer of poetry, drama, fiction, essays and music criticism.“
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amiri_Baraka
*I corrected the spelling of the name "Amiri" that was given in this Wikipedia page (which spelled that name "Amear". "Imamu" is a title that means "spiritual leader".

I've read that this African American poet's, playwright's, critic's, and activist's birth name was spelled "Leroy" at birth (the same as his father's middle name Colt Leroy Jones), but he changed the spelling of his name at a later date. However, I can't find the source for this information.

**
"Tamala Regina Jones (born November 12, 1974)[1] is an American actress https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamala_Jones

**
"Elvin Ray Jones (September 9, 1927 – May 18, 2004) was an American jazz drummer of the post-bop era.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elvin_Jones

**
"Ed Lee Jones (born February 23, 1951), commonly known as Ed "Too Tall" Jones, is a retired American football player who played 15 seasons (1974–1978, 1980–1989) in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys.[1] In 1979, he briefly left football to attempt a career in professional boxing."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ed_%22Too_Tall%22_Jones

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Etymology Of The Last Name "Moore" & Its Frequency In The United States, With Special Attention To African Americans

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about the etymology of the last name (surname) "Moore" and its frequency in the United States, particularly with Black Americans.

The content of this post is given for etymological purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/12/etymology-of-last-name-jones-its.html for the somewhat related post on the etymology of the last name "Jones" & its frequency in the USA.

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2016/02/washington-blackest-last-name-in-united.html for a related 2016 pancocojams post entitled "Washington"- The Blackest Last Name In The United States.

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ETYMOLOGY OF THE LAST NAME "MOORE"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moore_(surname)
"Moore is a popular English-language surname. It is the 34th most common surname in Australia, 32nd most common in England,[1] and was the 16th most common surname in the United States in 2000.[2]

It can have several meanings and derivations, as it appeared as a surname long before written language had developed in most of the population, resulting in a variety of spellings.

Variations of the name can appear as O'More or Moor; as well as the Scottish Gaelic originations Muir, Mure and Mor/Mór; the Manx Gaelic origination Moar; the Irish Gaelic originations O'More and Ó Mórda; and the later Irish variants O'Moore or 'Moore and the French de la Mora (William De La More).

The similarly pronounced surname Mohr is of Germanic lineage and is not related to the Gaelic/English variations.

Meanings and origins
From Middle English mor meaning "open land" or "bog" and given to persons dwelling near a moor or heath.

The Old Irish Moores are O'Morda, from the Irish Gaelic word morda, meaning "stately and noble". The French persons named de Mora, who were established in Ireland's Munster province, were known as O'More after 200 years in Co. Leix. After WW1, "Moore" as a phonetic rendering of the name derived from the word "moor", or "healthy mountain," became the written version for similar-sounding names. Alternatively of Gaelic/Manx origin Moar, this name was for a collector of manorial rents on the Isle of Man.

The spelling "Moore" was sometimes used to indicate a son of someone called More - this being one use where spelling is significant.

Possibly derived from Maurus, a Roman first name which meant "dark skinned" in Latin, and related to the Old French More meaning "Moor," such as Berber, a colloquial nickname for a person of dark complexion, often describing someone of North African descent.

Possibly originated from early references to persons who worked with boats at a wharf or moorage.

The De La Mare surname from French Normandy was progressively anglicized in England as "de la Mare" (Walter de la Mare), "De La More", "More", and "Moore" in England.

Frequency
In the United States, "Moore" ranked 16th among all surnames in the 2000 census, accounting for 0.26% of the population, falling from 9th in the 1990 census.[2][3]

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE MOORS
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moors
"The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta during the Middle Ages. The Moors initially were the Berber autochthones of the Maghreb.[1] The name was later also applied to Arabs.[2][3]

Moors are not a distinct or self-defined people,[4] and the 1911 Encyclopaedia Britannica observed that "The term 'Moors' has no real ethnological value."[5] Medieval and early modern Europeans variously applied the name to Arabs, North African Berbers, and Muslim Europeans.[6]

The term has also been used in Europe in a broader, somewhat derogatory sense to refer to Muslims in general,[7] especially those of Arab or Berber descent, whether living in Spain or North Africa.[8] During the colonial era, the Portuguese introduced the names "Ceylon Moors" and "Indian Moors" in Sri Lanka, and the Bengali Muslims were also called Moors.[9]

In 711, troops mostly formed by Moors from North Africa led the Umayyad conquest of Hispania. The Iberian peninsula then came to be known in classical Arabic as Al-Andalus, which at its peak included most of Septimania and modern-day Spain and Portugal.

In 827, the Moors occupied Mazara on Sicily, developing it as a port.[10] They eventually consolidated the rest of the island and some of southern Italy. Differences in religion and culture led to a centuries-long conflict with the Christian kingdoms of Europe, which tried to reclaim control of Muslim areas; this conflict was referred to as the Reconquista. In 1224 the Muslims were expelled from Sicily to the settlement of Lucera, which was destroyed by European Christians in 1300.

The fall of Granada in 1492 marked the end of Muslim rule in Iberia, although a Muslim minority persisted until their expulsion in 1609.[11]

Etymology
During the classical period, the Romans interacted with, and later conquered, parts of Mauretania, a state that covered modern northern Morocco, western Algeria, and the Spanish cities Ceuta and Melilla.[12] The Berber tribes of the region were noted in Classical literature as Mauri, which was subsequently rendered as "Moors" in English and in related variations in other European languages.[13] Mauri (Μαῦροι) is recorded as the native name by Strabo in the early 1st century. This appellation was also adopted into Latin, whereas the Greek name for the tribe was Maurusii (Μαυρούσιοι).[14] The Moors were also mentioned by Tacitus as having revolted against the Roman Empire in 24 AD.[15]

The 16th century scholar Leo Africanus (c. 1494–1554) of Al-Andalus identified the Moors as the native Berber inhabitants of the former Roman Africa Province (Africans). He described Moors as one of five main population groups on the continent alongside Egyptians, Abyssinians (Abassins), Arabians and Cafri (Cafates).[1]

Modern meanings
In medieval Romance languages, variations of the Latin word for the Moors (for instance, Italian and Spanish: moro, French: maure, Portuguese: mouro, Romanian: maur) developed different applications and connotations. The term initially denoted a specific Berber people in western Libya, but the name acquired more general meaning during the medieval period, associated with "Muslim", similar to associations with "Saracens". During the context of the Crusades and the Reconquista, the term Moors included the derogatory suggestion of "infidels".

Apart from these historic associations and context, Moor and Moorish designate a specific ethnic group speaking Hassaniya Arabic. They inhabit Mauritania and parts of Algeria, Western Sahara, Tunisia, Morocco, Niger, and Mali. In Niger and Mali, these peoples are also known as the Azawagh Arabs, after the Azawagh region of the Sahara.[16]

The authoritative dictionary of the Spanish language does not list any derogatory meaning for the word moro, a term generally referring to people of Maghrebian origin in particular or Muslims in general.[17] Some authors have pointed out that in modern colloquial Spanish use of the term moro is derogatory for Moroccans in particular[18][19][20][21][22] and Muslims in general.

In modern, colloquial Portuguese, the term Mouro was primarily used as a designation for North Africans and secondarily as a derogatory and ironic term by northern Portuguese to refer to the inhabitants of the southern parts of the country (Lisbon, Alentejo, and Algarve). However, this designation has gained more acceptance in the south.

In the Philippines, a former Spanish colony, many modern Filipinos call the large, local Muslim minority concentrated in Mindanao and other southern islands Moros. The word is a catch-all term, as Moro may come from several distinct ethno-linguistic groups such as the Maranao people. The term was introduced by Spanish colonisers, and has since been appropriated by Filipino Muslims as an endonym, with many self-identifying as members of the Bangsamoro "Moro Nation".

Moreno can mean dark-skinned in Spain, Portugal, Brazil, and the Philippines. Also in Spanish, morapio is a humorous name for "wine", especially that which has not been "baptized" or mixed with water, i.e., pure unadulterated wine. Among Spanish speakers, moro came to have a broader meaning, applied to both Filipino Moros from Mindanao, and the moriscos of Granada. Moro refers to all things dark, as in "Moor", moreno, etc. It was also used as a nickname; for instance, the Milanese Duke Ludovico Sforza was called Il Moro because of his dark complexion.[23]

In Portugal, mouro (feminine, moura) may refer to supernatural beings known as enchanted moura, where "moor" implies 'alien' and 'non-Christian'. These beings were siren-like fairies with golden or reddish hair and a fair face. They were believed to have magical properties.[24] From this root, the name moor is applied to unbaptized children, meaning not Christian.[25][26] In Basque, mairu means moor and also refers to a mythical people.[2]”....

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FREQUENCY OF THE LAST NAME "MOORE" AMONG BLACK AMERICANS
Excerpt #1:
From https://names.mongabay.com/data/black.html
Most common last names for Blacks in the U.S. [2000]
"The following is a list of the most common surnames for people who self-identified as "Black" in America during the 2000 Census [updated data]. The data, which may include people who identified themselves as African-American, African, or other ethnic or racial groups, is derived from the U.S. Bureau of the Census.

Last name / Surname: MOORE

[...]

Surname rank among blacks: 13

[...]

% of people with surname self-identifying as 'black': 26.9%

U.S. Rank: 16 "

****
Excerpt #2:
From https://names.mongabay.com/race/2010/population-black.html [2010]
Name: MOORE

[...]

Surname rank among blacks: 13

% black in genpop 2010: 27.74

[...]

% Total general population rank: 18 "

****
Excerpt #3:
From http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/05/50-most-common-african-american.html "50 MOST COMMON AFRICAN AMERICAN SURNAMES (Based on Births among Allegheny County, Pennsylvania Residents) During 1992-2001
"Note: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is the largest city in Allegheny County.

[...]
20. Moore (151) [# of Black babies* with the surname "Moore" who were born in Allegheny County during those years; "Black" defined as anyone of Black descent, included children of Black/non-Black birth parents]

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A FEW FAMOUS BLACK AMERICANS WITH THE LAST NAME "MOORE"

These names are given in no particular order.

Reverend James Moore Sr. (February 1, 1956 – June 7, 2000), born James Leslie Moore in Detroit, Michigan, was a gospel artist well known throughout the gospel recording industry for his powerful vocal abilities https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Moore_(gospel_singer)

**
Arnold Dwight "Gatemouth" Moore (November 8, 1913 – May 19, 2004)[1] was an American blues and gospel singer, songwriter, radio disc jockey, community leader and pastor, later known as Reverend Gatemouth Moore. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gatemouth_Moore

**
Jackie Moore (born 1946, Jacksonville, Florida[1]) is an American R&B singer. She is best known for her gold single 1970 song "Precious, Precious," which reached #30 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 6, 1971. This disc sold over one million copies, and received a gold disc awarded by the R.I.A.A. in March 1971.[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jackie_Moore_(singer)

**
Rudolph Frank Moore (March 17, 1927 – October 19, 2008), known as Rudy Ray Moore, was an American comedian, musician, singer, film actor, and film producer.[1] He was perhaps best known as Dolemite (the name derived from the mineral dolomite),[2] the uniquely articulate pimp from the 1975 film Dolemite, and its sequels, The Human Tornado and The Return of Dolemite.[3] The persona was developed during his earlier comedy records,[4][5] for which Moore has been called "the Godfather of Rap". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rudy_Ray_Moore

**
"James Isaac Moore (January 11, 1924 – January 31, 1970),[1][nb 1] better known by his stage name Slim Harpo, was an American blues musician, a leading exponent of the swamp blues style, and "one of the most commercially successful blues artists of his day."... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slim_Harpo

**
"Bebe Moore Campbell (born Elizabeth Bebe Moore; February 18, 1950 – November 27, 2006), was an American author, journalist and teacher."...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebe_Moore_Campbell

**
Shemar Franklin Moore (born April 20, 1970) is an American actor and former fashion model."...[male] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shemar_Moore

**
Leonard Edward Moore (born November 25, 1933) is a former American football halfback. He played college football at Pennsylvania State University and professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the Baltimore Colts from 1956 to 1967"...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenny_Moore

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Two Traditional Renditions of "The Manificat" & Three Gospelized Examples Of The Song "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord"

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents information about the Christian prayer/hymn "The Magnificat" ("Song Of Mary").

This post also presents two "traditional" and three gospelized renditions of that hymn.

"Gospelized hymns" ("gospelized Spirituals", "gospelized songs") are terms that I coined for religious songs that are performed in an African American gospel style. An example showcased in this post expands that definition by presenting a hymn that is performed in a Yoruba (Nigeria) gospel style.

Two of these gospelized renditions are entitled "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord" and are performed by O'Lander Draper & The Associates and O' Lander Draper's Associates.

The third rendition is performed by the Daystar Healing Streams of God Choir (Nigeria) and is titled "Messiah" (although its lyrics are the same as "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord").

Lyrics for "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord" are included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the unknown composer of this hymn and thanks to all of the choirs for their musical legacy. Special thanks to O'Lander Draper for his musical legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these videos on YouTube.

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INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "MY SOUL DOTH MAGNIFY THE LORD"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnificat
"The Magnificat (Latin: [My soul] magnifies [the Lord]) is a canticle, also known as the Song of Mary, the Canticle of Mary, and, in the Byzantine tradition, the Ode of the Theotokos... It is traditionally incorporated into the liturgical services of the Catholic Church (at vespers) and of the Eastern Orthodox churches (at the morning services).[1] It is one of the eight most ancient Christian hymns and perhaps the earliest Marian hymn.[2][3] Its name comes from the incipit of the Latin version of the canticle's text.

The text of the canticle is taken directly from the Gospel of Luke (1:46–55) where it is spoken by Mary upon the occasion of her Visitation to her cousin Elizabeth.[2] In the narrative, after Mary greets Elizabeth, who is pregnant with John the Baptist, the latter moves within Elizabeth's womb. Elizabeth praises Mary for her faith (using words partially reflected in the Hail Mary), and Mary responds with what is now known as the Magnificat.

Within the whole of Christianity, the Magnificat is most frequently recited within the Liturgy of the Hours. In Western Christianity, the Magnificat is most often sung or recited during the main evening prayer service: Vespers in the Catholic and Lutheran churches, and Evening Prayer (or Evensong) in Anglicanism. In Eastern Christianity, the Magnificat is usually sung at Sunday Matins. Among Protestant groups, the Magnificat may also be sung during worship services, especially in the Advent season during which these verses are traditionally read."...
-snip-
That Wikipedia page includes the Latin and Anglican translations of "The Magnificat".

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LYRICS: MY SOUL DOTH MAGNIFY THE LORD
(O'Lander Draper And The Associates)

Chorus:

My soul doth magnify the Lord
My soul doth magnify the Lord
(Repeat)

For he has done so many wonderful
and marvelous things
He reached down and saved me and
He changed my name.

Chorus:

My soul doth magnify the Lord
My soul doth magnify the Lord

Do do do do a-do do

Well well well well well well well well well well

Do-well do-well do-well do-well a woo-woo

My soul doth magnify the Lord

Hallelujah! Hallelujah!
My soul doth magnify the Lord
Thank You Jesus! Thank You Jesus!
My soul doth magnify the Lord

Source: https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/O-Landa-Draper-And-The-Associates/My-Soul-Doth-Magnify-the-Lord

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLES:
"Standard" Renditions Of "The Magnificat" ("The Song Of Mary")
Example #1: Magnificat (Song of Mary)



Orlando Deanery Choirs, Published on Jun 11, 2013

Magnificat, (Latin: [My soul] magnifies), also known as the Song of Mary or the Canticle of Mary. Its name comes from the first word of the Latin version of the canticle's text. Arranged by David Hogan and commissioned for the Festival of Evensong of Thanksgiving at Washington National Cathedral.

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Example #2: 'Mary's Magnificat' | The Choir of St Paul's



The CatholicTV Network, Published on Dec 18, 2014

The Choir of St Paul's Harvard Square performs 'Mary's Magnificat' (Andrew Carter) at the Cathedral of the Holy Cross.

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Renditions by "O'Lander Draper & The Associates and O'Lander Draper's Associates
Example #1: My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord - O'Landa Draper & The Associates



Pannellctp Traditional Gospel Music, Published on Oct 7, 2012

WOW Gospel 2000: 16 Top Videos (VHS) Release Date: 2/24/2004

More than a dozen inspirational songs are featured in this installment of the WOW music-video series. WOW Gospel 2000: 16 Top Videos includes "Jesus Is All" by Fred Hammond & Radical for Christ, "Power Belongs to God" by Hezekiah Walker & The Love Fellowship Crusade Choir, "Reminding the Saints of the Hope" by Carlton Pearson, and more.
-snip-
Google search result:
Artist: O'Landa Draper and the Associates
Album: Live...A Celebration of Praise
Released: 1994
-snip-
Here's information about O'Lander Draper from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O%27Landa_Draper
"O'Landa Draper (September 29, 1963 – July 21, 1998)[2] was a Grammy Award-winning Gospel music artist. He was the founder of the Associates Choir and is considered to be one of the top gospel artists of the 1990s. Draper was nominated for the Grammy Award, Stellar Awards and the Dove Award multiple times.
Draper was known for his choir directing style. Songs that were well known by fans of Draper's work were, "My Soul Doth Magnify the Lord", "Lift the Savior Up, "Stand Up", Gotta Feelin'", "He Touched Me", and "Give It Up".[3]"....

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Example #2: My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord (VHS) - O'Landa Draper's Associates,"All About Him (Jesus)"



Pannellctp Traditional Gospel Music, Published on Jun 16, 2012

Kidney failure may have prematurely ended the life of its founder and creative director, O'Landa Draper, at the age of 34, in July 1998, but the Memphis, TN-based gospel group O'Landa Draper & the Associates continues his musical crusade. The group, now directed by Draper's fiancée, Patrina Smith, released a video, All About Him (Jesus), featuring their performance at their annual Music Lover's Conference in 2000.

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Daystar Healing Stream Of God Choir (Rendition Of "My Soul Doth Magnify The Lord" entitled "Messiah", beginning at 3:03 - 9:05 in this video)


Daystar Carol 2011 4



The Psalmist Music, Published on Jan 2, 2014

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Sunday, December 10, 2017

Nigeria's Daystar Healing Streams Of God Choir (2014) - "Odun" (Christmas & New Years Song)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases Daystar Healing Streams Of God choir's and orchestra's performance of the Yoruba (Nigerian) song "Odun".

The content of this post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Daystar Healing Streams Of God choir and orchestra for their rendition of this Yoruba (Nigerian) song. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post, and thanks the publishers of this song on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE EXAMPLE: Daystar Carol 2014 Odun



TruSpice Consulting, Published on Feb 7, 2015
-snip-
Here are a three comments from this video's discussion thread:

Deborah Temitope, 2015
"wow wow wow! This is creativity at its peak! I had goose bumps listening to this evergreen song performed by one of the original singers alongside the Daystar choir! God bless you for this!"

**
Funke James, 2016
"This is really good it's nice to see mummy Fasoyin back again after a long long time.,God bless Daddy and Mummy Adeyemi of Day Star 🌟 for bringing Evangelist back on stage..The Lord keep you all to the very end in JESUS NAME... ODUN AYABO FUN GBOGBO WA OOOOOOO"
-snip-
I think that "Odun ayabo fun gbogbo wa oooo" means something like "Our love for all in the new year". [said with emphasis] (from combined results of Google translates for the sentence, for the word "odun", and for the word "ayabo".

**
sade sekoni, 2017
"i love this song so much, it made me remember my childhood. God bless this woman"

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LYRICS: ODUN* (Year)
(as sung by Daystar Healing Streams Of God Choir (Nigeria, 2014)

Kiresimesi Odun de o
(Christmas is here)

Kiresimesi Odun de o
(Christmas is here)

Kiresimesi Odun de o
(Christmas is here)

Kiresimesi Odun de o
(Christmas is here)

Odun ti de
(Christmas is here)

Odun yi a tur a
(This year will be comforting)

Koni le ko ko mo mi
(It won’t be hard for me)

Kiresimesi Odun de o
(Christmas is here)

Odun, Odun, Odun, Odun, Odun
(Xmas, Xmas, Xmas, Xmas, Xmas)

Odun yi a tur a
(This year will be comforting)

Koni le ko ko mo mi
(It won’t be hard for me)

Kiresimesi Odun de o
(Christmas is here)

Odun, Odun, Odun, Odun, Odun
(Xmas, Xmas, Xmas, Xmas, Xmas)

Odun yi a tur a,
(This year will be comforting)

Koni le ko ko mo mi
(It won’t be hard for me)

Soloist: Ohun ti mo da’wole
(What I lay my hands on)

Choir: A yori
(will be successful)

Soloist: Ohun ti mo bere
(What I asked for)

Choir: L’oluwa yio se e e e
(The Lord will do)

Odun yi a tur a,
(This year will be comforting)

Odun yi a tur a,
(This year will be comforting)

Koni le ko ko mo mi
(It won’t be hard for me)

Odun n’lo so pi n o
(This year is coming to an end)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba maa so wa o
(Oh Lord guide us)

t’omo t’omo
(and our children)

Ohun ti o pa wa le kun o
(Sorrow and sadness)

L’odun titun
(in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si wa o
(it will not be our portion)

Baba rere
(Good God)

refrain
Odun n’lo so pi n o
(This year is coming to an end)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba maa so wa o
(Oh Lord guide us)

t’omo t’omo
(and our children)

Ohun ti o pa wa le kun o
(Sorrow and sadness)

L’odun titun
(in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si wa o
(will not be our portion)

Baba rere
(Good God)

end of the refrain

Soloist: Ma je n kawo leri sokun
(May I not weep)

Ma je n daso ofo bora
(May I not mourn)

Ogun roju je roju mu
(struggle and lack)

ma ma je o je ti temi
(May it not be my portion I pray)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Alafia pipe ni mo fe ti tami lore
(perfect peace I desire)

Je n’rina je n’ rilo
(I pray for abundance)

Baba wa semi logo
(Lord, shower your abundance on me)

Ma je natawo na
(May I not lack)

Ma je ntaraka lodun titun
(May I not wander)

Choir & Soloist : Da abo Olorun mi da abo
(My Lord hear my plea)

Da abo Olorun mi da abo
(My Lord hear my plea)

Choir: Mama je kan fire temi sa’pile
(My blessing will not be taken away)

Soloist: Lodun titun
(In the new Year)

Choir: Ma ma jekoro mi jasofo lodo re
(May my prayers to you not be in vain

Da abo Olorun mi da abo
(My Lord hear my plea)

Odun n’lo so pi n o
(This year is coming to an end)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba maa so wa o
(Oh Lord guide us)

t’omo t’omo
(and our children)

Ohun ti o pa wa le kun o
(Sorrow and sadness)

L’odun titun
(in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si wa o
(will not be our portion)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Odun n’lo so pi n o
(This year is coming to an end)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba maa so wa o
(Oh Lord guide us)

t’omo t’omo
(and our children)

Ohun ti o pa wa le kun o
(Sorrow and sadness)

L’odun titun
(in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si wa o
(will not be our portion)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Soloist & choir: Baba Eleruniyin wa su re fun wa
(Great one bless us greatly)

Ani ka rona gbegba l’odun to wole
(May we make headway in the coming year)

Soloist: Baba Eleruniyin wa su re fun wa
(Great one bless us greatly)

Ani ka rona gbegba l’odun to wole
(May we make headway in the coming year)

Tuwon ninu Oluwa tuwon ninu
(Oh Lord Comfort them, Lord comfort them)

Agan ti ko roma gbepon tuwon ninu Olowa
(The barren ones Lord comfort them)

Re won l’ekun Oluwa, re won l’ekun
(Wipe their tears, oh Lord, Oh Lord wipe their tears)

Awon to dabi Hannah re won l’ekun Oluwa
(Those like Hannah, wipe their tears oh Lord

Soloist: Odoodun lan ro’rogbo
(Crops are seasonal)

Kodun ko san wa s’owo
(The new year will bring wealth)

K’odun ko san wa s’omo
(The new year will bring fruitfulness)

Kari ba tise k’odun yabo ka r’ona gbe gba
(May we make headway and be fruitful in the new year)

Ani k’ama toro je ani k’ama toro mu
(May we not beg to eat or drink)

K’ama l’a kisa keyin aso Baba gbo tiwa
(May we not wear rags, dear Lord)

K’ama se r’ogun ejo
(May we not get into trouble)

Ba wa segun aisan
(Deliver us from sickness)

Ogun asedanu ogun akowaba ba wa se
(May we not labor in vain)

Abo re to daju-la wa nfe-l’odun to wole
(We desire your divine protection in the new year)

Ohun rere to ye wa Baba fi se wa l’ogo
(Lord, bless us with the good things we desire)

Ohun tio pawa l’ekun o ninu odun
(Whatever will make me weep in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si woro
(will not be our portion)

(Baba rere)

Choir: Odun n’lo so pi n o
(This year is coming to an end)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba maa so wa o
(Oh Lord guide us)

t’omo t’omo
(and our children)

Ohun ti o pa wa le kun o
(Sorrow and sadness)

L’odun titun
(in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si wa o
(will not be our portion)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Oh Lord our help, Oh Lord

Soloist-Oh Lord Jesus

Choir- Oh Lord our help in times of need

Soloist-***soloist sings or speaks extemporaneously

Oluwa mi
(My God)

Choir- Oh Lord our help oh Lord

Soloist- Olorun e***
(Oh Lord)

Choir: Oh Lord our help in times of need

Soloist: ????***

Choir- Oh Lord our help oh Lord

Soloist: ????***

Choir: Oh Lord our help in times of need

Soloist: ????***

Ni mo wo Jesu titi o fi da mi l’ola
(I look up to Jesus till I’m blessed)

Choir: Oh Lord our help in ages past

Soloist: ????**

Choir: Our help for years to come

Soloist: ????**

Choir- Our shelter from the stormy blast and our eternal home.

Soloist: ????**
Choir- to endless years the same
Soloist: In Jesus name
Crops are seasonal ** The soloist says this in Yoruba
In Jesus name
We shall see the new year
In Jesus name
Ill will not happen to us
In Jesus name
We will all succeed

Choir: Odun n’lo so pi n o
(This year is coming to an end)

soloist continues to talk extemporaneously in English for a portion of this refrain

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba maa so wa o
(Oh Lord guide us)

t’omo t’omo
(and our children)

Ohun ti o pa wa le kun o
(Sorrow and sadness)

L’odun titun
(in the new year)

Ma je ko se le si wa o
(will not be our portion)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba rere
(Good God)

Baba mimo
(Holy God)
-snip-
*This lyrics are from the sub-titles in the video. Some of the subtitles are difficult to read. Additions and corrections are welcome.

My notes are given in italics.

****
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